Category: SENIORS

Written by Teresa Goodnight

With tears running down my cheeks, I heard the cancer specialist explain there was nothing we could do for my grandmother last year. I watched her face, as she didn’t quite understand what he was saying. I held her hand. My mother asked questions that I tuned out, as the only information that mattered was that my grandmother’s days were short In number. We walked downstairs to sit outside, while my mother went to get the car. My grandmother asked me what the doctor had meant. “Is there anything they can do?” she asked.

I tried to avoid the conversation. I didn’t want to say it. She pressed me again. So, I answered. She held my trembling hand in her fragile thinning hand and assured me it was ok. She then told me that the world was getting further and further from God. She said she wouldn’t be surprised if Jesus came back before anything happened. The one thing she assured me of, which I already knew, was that if Jesus didn’t come back first, she would beat me to heaven. We lost my grandmother a few weeks later. 

A month after she passed, my mother handed me her Bible. It may be one of the most meaningful things I ever received. I didn’t even know I wanted it. It was full of bookmarkers I had given her, the gift note in my handwriting to Josephine Rhyne, when we gave it to her Christmas of 1993. It had a postcard I sent her from Cannes in 1999. There were notes here and there, underlined texts, and passages of importance written on papers folded between the pages. 

I treasure every little one of them.

“I remember your genuine faith, for you share the faith that first filled your grandmother Lois and your mother, Eunice. And I know that same faith continues strong in you…for God has not given you a spirit of fear and timidity, but of power, love and self discipline.” 2 Timothy 1:5-7 NLV.

My grandmother’s legacy was not one of fortune or fame, but one of faith in God. She made her share of mistakes, triumphs, and sacrifices. She scolded me when I was frustrated with my mom or my sisters. She reminded me to forgive as I had been forgiven. She taught me every Christian makes mistakes—ones they regret, confess, and are forgiven for by God. In our last lucid conversation, she told me to go pay attention to my husband, because she always valued relationships in the family and reminded me to cherish the incredible men I had been given in my grandfather, father and my husband. Her advice was stern when needed but laced with love and beautiful grace all the same.

Goodness. I do miss her. I remember sneaking into “big church” lying with my head or my feet across her and my mom. Oh, if I could go back to those days and soak it all in just a little longer. But truth is—I did soak it in. We soaked it in. Her faith was passed on to my mother. They both passed it to me. I will pass it to my daughter. It will be passed from generation to generation. 

So many people spend hours on their wills, outlining every precious thing they own and selecting who will receive what. It’s a thoughtful process and I’m sure filled with love. However, what my grandmother left for my mother, for me, for my sisters, and her grandchildren and all of her family that we cherish was her living, breathing faith in God. It is a legacy impacting us all for eternity. There is no amount of money and no treasure as great, as the treasure of God her legacy helped plant in my heart. 

Think hard about the legacy you are leaving behind. Whether intentional or by chance, we are all leaving one. At Community Spirit, we pray yours will be one making an eternal impact on those you love for generations to come. #GoDoBe

Quotes to Chew On:

“The greatest legacy you can pass on to your children and grandchildren is not your money or the other material things you have accumulated in life. The greatest legacy you can pass on to them is the legacy of your character and your faith.” Billy Graham, Nearing Home p. 119

“Wise counsel to the younger is the duty of the aged.” Unknown

“Young people are very sensitive to hypocrisy; if they sense it in us, they will dismiss our pretenses and pay no attention to our advice…if they can sense our faith is sincere and our love is authentic, then they will respect us and take us seriously (even when they know we are not perfect.).” Billy Graham, Nearing Home p. 121

Senior Moments, sponsored by Visiting Angels
918.609.5600 Tulsa or 918.333.7400 Bartlesville
visitingangels.com/greencountry


Written by Teresa Goodnight

Isn’t it funny how a well-played game is still best remembered for the plays in the fourth quarter? You play well to get there, but man—when that ball goes over the line in the final seconds for the victory, it’s just a moment. It’s all you talk about the next day.  Eventually you get around to what led there—which was dedication and hard work, but that play feels like a defining moment.  If you don’t execute on it—it’s also one of those haunting lost moments of opportunity.

Dr. Henry Migliore likes to reference his life as somewhere between the fourth quarter and overtime. Just a year ago, the doctors were calling in his family to say their goodbyes.  Today, he met me at the Village Inn, because I wanted to understand how at 78, I’ve observed him living with such purpose and building his legacy.  Everywhere I go—he’s there.  Everyone I meet, he knows.  Even while at Mend Medical Clinic and Pregnancy Resource Center one day, I happened to mention talking with Henry.  Forrest Cowan said “I know him.  He showed up here wanting a desk one day. I wondered who he was. I started looking back through our history as an organization and his name was everywhere.  I got the guy a desk to use.” 

I’ve only known Henry a few months, but from what I’ve experienced, he’s kind of everywhere in everything.  He has this purposeful desire to listen to God’s spirit and to move where he’s led.  It’s so intentional.  However, with Henry, getting to the conversation you intend takes a little navigation.  

Let me explain.  Before sitting down for breakfast, he ran into two former students, who were excited to see their former professor (and also kind enough to buy our lunch!).  Then, after a brief chat with those gentlemen, the conversation led us to another with our lovely waitress.  We started discussing her spiritual battles with fear and anxiety.  Before long, we’d invited her to church.  It was as if we were longtime friends, exchanging numbers while discussing Henry’s love for pancakes.  A few minutes later, the woman sitting behind Henry said, “I almost jumped in the middle of your conversation. I loved it.  It was so easy for you to invite her to church.” We discussed her church and her heart for adoption and fostering ministries.

In just about an hour, I felt engaged with much of the restaurant, both staff and guests.  I think that’s just what happens when you are with Henry. His love for the Lord and people is infectious.  His willingness to listen to the slightest nudge from the Holy Spirit lands him in places not originally on his radar. He exudes the love of Christ and genuinely wants to impact people everywhere he goes. Make no mistake, it’s not an accident though.  Henry is incredibly INTENTIONAL.  He sets his mind on things above, opens his heart with his eyes and ears, and charts the course daily knowing full well the Spirit of the Lord might nudge him on a few rabbit trails prepared in advance for him to do.   And, he does all of this with severe migraines, lower strength, and a general malaise taking its toll.  Henry said, “I just adjust my plan based on my new circumstances and head on as far down the road as I can travel.” 

Henry has so much history at 78—it’s difficult to think about how to capture the essence of such a legacy in a magazine article.  He’s a record setting athlete, a former Dean of Business at Oral Roberts University (ORU), an accredited author with over 17 books published in 7 languages, and a strategic consultant.  He has recommendations and accolades from past students and clients singing his praises for his business strategy and guidance.  Above all these things, or rather intertwined into all of these things, he is a man intentionally and passionately following after God.    

I asked Henry about a moment when he felt everything changed for him.  What was that big pivotal decision?  Henry said it came in 1970 after a 7-year stint with Continental Can.  To get there, he took me back a bit in the story.  “I became part of an executive training program at Continental.  There were 200 of us in the room.  They started the session explaining they only needed a hundred”, said Henry.  He continued, “They said ‘We’re either gonna get rid of you or you won’t be able to stand the pressure.’”  Henry followed, “Coming out of the military and college athletics, I was conditioned for stress and knew how to endure.  So, I became the youngest key manufacturing manager in a top 50 corporation at the time. I dealt with union groups and some of the toughest mob groups in Chicago.”  

Henry’s story continued.  At 30, they wanted to send him to New York to be the youngest Vice President in the corporation. He had a big expense account, a big career and a nice salary. But, in 1970, Henry said “My mother, on her little typewriter, wrote me a letter and said ‘You know they are opening a university right in Tulsa called ORU.  You have a master’s degree.  Wouldn’t it be fun if you would move home?”  So what Henry did was not unlike what many of us have done to ward off mom’s pleas.  Henry said, “I sat down in front of my old typewriter and sent them a 7-year old resume with my bad typing and my 2.29 GPA.” Henry quipped, “I never thought more about it except that they would write back and reject me.  Then, I could make a copy and send it to my mother.”  Henry and I both laughed a little about the persistence of a mother.  

Henry continued, “Then 3 days later, Harold Paul called me and started a dialogue. He called every 2-3 days to pray with me.”  Henry continued the conversations, as he enjoyed them, but had no intention of taking the position.  Henry said, “He then told me he wanted me to fly out and possibly join the faculty.  I told him my parents lived close to the University and I would fly out to meet him, but I was honest.  I told him straight out that I wasn’t going to accept the position, but it would be nice to see my parents.”  Henry went on, “The meeting went fine and he offered me the position, but it wasn’t for a few nights later back at home that it hit me.  It was about 2 am and I whispered to Mari ‘Are you thinking what I’m thinking?’ She immediately said ‘Yes.’ Then he said ‘We’ve gotta go to ORU.’”  Henry chuckled a bit as it seems a bit ridiculous to most when you say it out loud.  He took a 50% pay cut, lost his giant expense account, lost his seemingly guaranteed success path with corporate America and followed God’s spirit in his heart.

Over 40 years later, Henry has no regrets.  Henry offered, “You never really know what would have happened.  Think of something big like that I might have been spared from 9/11?” Then Henry said, “What I do know is if I had taken a 45-minute train back and forth to work daily, I would’ve missed out on time with my kids. I would’ve probably made more money, but after seeing how the Lord has guided our lives from 1970 until the minute we’re sitting here, it was the right choice.” 

Henry came from a Christian home, which really gave him a leg up on his journey with Christ.  His mother and father raised him in church faithfully.  Then when he was 13 their pastor, Cecil Bolding, started working alongside of him at his parents Western Auto store.  Henry said he gained valuable wisdom from his pastor and friend.  It really was a mentorship in the workplace, offering Henry even greater exposure to the things of Christ.  It’s such a great reminder of the investment we need to make in future generations.  The impact of those interactions can transfer from generation to generation.    

May 13 of 2018, Henry said “EMSA fired an alert to family and friends and people are coming into see us in the ER.  They had given up and thought I was gone. His granddaughter in law, a charge nurse at St. Francis, made a suggestion and suddenly, the game was going into overtime.”  Henry spoke boldly, “The Lord must’ve needed me for something else.  I just believe that.  I’d love to be the old Henry full of energy going to chamber meetings, being impressive but I can barely function some days.” Henry said, “I’m hoping my legacy will be that people see I kept moving for the Lord even when it was a struggle.” 

Henry told me that things he now copes with are as simple as that he forgets where he’s going.  He said, “If I’m familiar with something I can do it.  I did a book signing at Barnes and Noble with a great turnout. I’m sitting there though struggling to even get up.” Henry went on, “The Lord just keeps opening doors up. I go through them—just slower than I used to move.  I’d like to think that whatever your story is about me—it is one that encourages others to think about their legacy and to keep going in the direction God has for them.  There’s still time.  Whatever quarter of life they are in—whatever their struggles, there’s still an impact they can make for Christ.” 

Henry says it best himself.  “My life is dedicated to living a life of integrity with devotion to my Heavenly Father.  I want to be the best family man possible–to be dedicated to my dear wife Mari of 54 years, my 3 children Theresa, Roscoe and Daniel and my 7 incredibly special grandchildren.”  Henry said he would want his obituary to reflect that “Henry just hung in there, was giving everything away until the Lord decided he had no more to give.”  He continued, “We’re all going to experience difficulties.  The real story will be how did each person navigate those steps through the 4th quarter of their life (whatever age that will be) to keep doing what God had for them to do.”  

Every one of us leaves a legacy.  There will be a story of our lives, our character, our choices. Henry reminds us all that purposefully seeking to leave a legacy for Christ, expanding that into whatever form it takes needs to be a priority. He’s a prime example of continuing that purpose into the 4th quarter—and will one day leave a life with very few regrets.  “It’s a life full of roads you didn’t see coming,” says Henry “but true fulfillment comes when we are ready to follow God’s whisper towards His purpose.”

Henry spends his 4th quarter, which he sometimes jokingly calls his overtime period, sharing these values with everyone he meets.  He follows Christ with passion and fervor with headaches that would leave most of us lying on our beds in a bit of despair.  He doesn’t want to waste one minute of what God has given him doing less than what God has called him to do. For me, that makes him more than a man of purposeful legacy.  It moves him into the category of a very rare modern-day hero.

Dr. Migliore has a book “A Biblical Approach to Life Planning” that you can grab a copy of on his website for $14.99. www.hmigliore.com

Email Dr. Migliore at hmigliore@aol.com and he will give you a link to his book.

https://youtu.be/1-xePO107IA Video for his 4th Quarter Redefined the Legacy Continues book.

Senior Moments, sponsored by Visiting Angels
918.609.5600 Tulsa or 918.333.7400 Bartlesville
visitingangels.com/greencountry


Written by Teresa Goodnight

Mary Williams isn’t consciously building a legacy, as much as she is living as a modern-day creator of change. She’s been paving the way for racial integration for as long as she can remember, holding positions across Tulsa enabling her to focus on her mission. She’s a woman of been doing it so long that it’s just the essence of her beautiful character. She has a way of making you feel so incredibly special—even when you are trying to focus on the amazing life she lives. 

Like many women with those special gifts, she somehow makes you feel as if you have known her all of your life. You just want to share things with her. Our conversation travelled all over the place. She laughed that we had to be careful whenever we talked, as a few minutes could turn into a few hours. I felt special that it might be just with me, but I knew Mary had that effervescent presence with everyone she met.

With her B.A. Degree from Oral Roberts University, Mary is a board member of Greenwood Chamber of Commerce helping to bridge gaps within our city. Mary has been the first, or only African American in positions around the city. She was the first African American to serve as Vice President of the Tulsa Chapter of the Association of Desk & Derrick Clubs, where they promote education around the oil industry. Mary is also a motivated women’s leader, mentor, speaker, writer and more.

Mary has played the role of a successful political campaign adviser, while also implementing the first monthly political community forums for a diverse candidate in North Tulsa. Mary also is the Director for the citywide “Juneteenth on Historic Greenwood,” an event focused on sharing “heritage, history and hope.” We could list event after event, organization after organization where Mary has been leading the way for diversification and change. 

Her overall mission is to help others find their purpose and reach their God-given destiny through her Color Me True Workshops she now puts on around the city. These sessions focus on personal and professional growth of the attendees. It’s really an empowerment program fostering identity of purpose and multicultural awareness. 

Mary said, “The Color Me True Workshop Program is designed to fit a wide variety of audiences. It provides steps for participants to find their purpose, build self-esteem and take possession of the path God has for them.” Mary continued, “Color Me True workshops have a proven successful track record after years of programming on the high school and collegiate levels, professional and doctoral levels, as well as special workshops for middle school and upper elementary school ages.”

Mary’s next project is dear to her heart. She’s working with Dr. Libby Adjei, the superintendent of Langston Hughes Academy for Arts and Technology. It’s a charter school in North Tulsa threatened with losing its battle to remain open. Mary is working with Dr. Adjei trying to save the school by offering a program about building self-esteem, establishing a cotillion for the students. She wants to teach men how to treat women, how to treat other men, and how to treat themselves. She wants to do the same for women. Mary said, “If we can learn to treat each other with respect and to respect ourselves, we can accomplish so many things we need in life.” 

Mary is a licensed minister and noted as a community servant who believes in the power of prayer. Prayer walking in the community is one of her favorite activities. She simply walks and prays on whatever God brings to mind. Sometimes she starts the walk with things on her heart, others she prays for people and places she sees along the journey. This amazing focus on time with the Lord is part of what creates such a peaceful spirit in her. She just exudes love all over the place. You just want to be around her and catch some of that love she’s throwing around so freely. I have to think that’s a bit of a picture of what being around Jesus was like—and isn’t He our role model for daily living? Mary is simply right on track following in the footsteps of her savior. 

Mary said, “When I leave this life, I hope what is left behind me — the work that I’ve given, the work I’ve served — has helped improve someone else’s life.” Mary continued, “It’s a spiritual thing. I get a sense of filling a spiritual part of me, a most important part of me when I help people find their God-given destiny.” I don’t think she has to leave anywhere to know she improved someone’s life. Like most she encounters, mine was improved just in the small time I spent with her.

Senior Moments, sponsored by Visiting Angels
918.609.5600 Tulsa or 918.333.7400 Bartlesville
visitingangels.com/greencountry

Color Me True Destiny Programs Word Study: True Meekness

Written by Mary L. Williams

What is the true meaning of Meekness? For many who follow today’s standards for success, meekness is an attribute that may leave you on the marginal sidelines of life. Yet, Jesus said in Matthew 5:3 (ESV) that the meek will inherit the earth. But, how? Was Jesus only referring to the millennial kingdom? 

Viewing Jesus as a Biblical model, meekness is wisdom and power in demonstration without being harsh or clamorous. It is composure under pressure and silence when others should speak. Meekness is a key attribute of a good listener with confident self-esteem. Many people confuse meekness with weakness. Au contraire mon ami! Weakness allows abuse of power to control the mind, will and emotions out of fear and false humility. Meekness, however, expresses itself with confident composure to do what is right in the face of opposition! Meekness is inherent in the divine nature of a born-again believer. (Reference Galatians 5:22-23). Jesus describes Himself as meek and He certainly was, yet he did not allow the hypocrites, Pharisees, and wicked people to control Him. A person who practices meekness does not allow the adversary to steal the gifts God has given to him or to distract him from their God-given purpose. 

As with most things in life, beware! There is a counterfeit. False meekness pretends to be soft and subtle through use of manipulation tactics and domination behind the scenes. False meekness masquerades in fear and discontent. False meekness plants soft nuggets of discord without being out-front and forthright. Open and honest discourse is not a preference for the person who hides behind the deceptive curtain of masked false meekness.

One may ask what is the difference between humility and meekness? Humility is an inner response of the heart and mind. True humility esteems others higher than oneself with unconditional positive regard. Meekness guides and protects the reactions of a humble heart with the infinite timing of wisdom. Meekness is the outer response of sincere humility.

Therefore, success can be gained on earth through a meek and quiet spirit when the Divine Holy Spirit is in control. There is NO FEAR in true meekness. Meekness is more than a conqueror through Christ Jesus!

Senior Moments, sponsored by Visiting Angels
918.609.5600 Tulsa or 918.333.7400 Bartlesville
visitingangels.com/greencountry


Written by Teresa Goodnight

One month shy of 36 years, that’s how long Cheryl Bauman, now 72, has been operating the Crisis Pregnancy Outreach (CPO) in Tulsa. 

Cheryl said, “In the beginning, we had no idea it would become a large, multi-faceted ministry. We just put one foot in front of the other and started walking. Immediately, God brought us a teen having twins. She stayed with a family and they mentored her. Then, things just grew from there.”  

Cheryl’s take is that people just have to be available. She said, “God doesn’t call the equipped. He equips those He calls.” She continued, “People get overwhelmed that they need to write these policies up right, have 20 meetings and maybe they’ll be ready. Usually those people just don’t get it off the ground. Sometimes you just have to say we’re willing and away you go.”  

That’s what she did. Now, CPO has so many things they offer–everything from parenting education for girls to helping with adoptions. Girls can even see a licensed therapist for free and then, they can continue to do so for the rest of their lives, if they want.  

The seniors of Tulsa continue to lead the way with their outreach ministries to our community.  Cheryl said.  “We’re not driven by money, because no one gets a salary. At CPO, we’re all volunteers. Each and every one of us has a heart to help women and babies God has placed in our path.”  CPO doesn’t factor in age, ethnicity, spiritual background–they just want to help with unplanned pregnancies. 

They aren’t there to judge, preach or pry. They simply want to help.

Help women discover the pregnancy options available and help pregnant women move forward successfully.

Cheryl says the women who come in are assigned a Christian mentor, who becomes their friend. They can call her day or night to hang out or to go to dinner together. Cheryl says, “Many of the girls who enter our program don’t have moms or they don’t have one who was invested in their lives. Many of them need a woman they can talk to about general things of life.”  

Cheryl said, “There are so many opportunities for people to volunteer in our organization and make a difference. We are always needing mentors. Usually those range in age from 25 and up.  For a 15 year old girl, a 25 year old mentor has a lot of valuable experience to share.” Cheryl said, “We’ve had women in their 70’s take on someone to mentor. They are happy to pour into a woman’s life and have so much wisdom to offer the girls.” Cheryl continued, “We are always needing women to drive women to their appointments–once a week or once a month. There’s usually 24 hours notice and if it won’t work for the volunteer, we just call someone else. It’s really a low pressure place to take part! We even have receptionist positions for just 2 hours a week. There are so many ways to get involved.”  

Cheryl said, “I always loved driving the girls. You always have a captive audience. You just sit in the car and visit. It makes such a difference when you are really investing in these other people’s lives. It’s what God calls us to do. It’s amazing to see these girls be transformed.”  Cheryl went on, “Sometimes they come in so broken and hardened. Then, over time, to see their hearts become soft and eager for the things of the Lord, completely transformed, there’s nothing quite like that.”  

Right now, Cheryl is searching for a house mom for their Sapulpa home. Cheryl said, “We own a home we bought in 2000, in Sapulpa. We can have 6 girls there comfortably or 8 in a pinch.    It’s a beautiful home. So, hopefully, we will be opening that again soon.” Cheryl said the house mom does live-in 24 hours a day. They are really looking for a woman who is a nurturer. “It’s the biggest thing,” said Cheryl. “These women need someone to really care for them and show them love. Many have never experienced that kind of care” she said. For the ones keeping their children, there is government assistance and other programs, but for those choosing adoption, Cheryl said, “They have no place to go. The vision was that they would have a home after they gave birth to recover and to heal. It’s been so successful.” 

One story, a girl named Mary, who was homeless and had several children she had placed for adoption. “After she picked her last family,” said Cheryl, “We asked Mary to come live in the home. She reminded us she had her tubes tied. So, no more babies. She just wanted to get back on the streets. She was a drug addict. We told her that we knew. We didn’t want anything from her. We just wanted to care for her as she recovered from the C-section. She finally agreed, but said, emphatically, she was only going to be there for 2 weeks. After a year, she moved out, eventually married, and now leads a beautifully successful life in South Tulsa. In fact, I had the pleasure of attending her celebration of being 10 years sober this past December.  She still can’t believe it herself. That’s why we do this.” 

Cheryl and I talked about their stats, as they have helped over 1,000 women in the last two years. Cheryl agreed, “Sometimes in the Christian population, we get wrapped up in those numbers. They do sound nice and they are incredible, but to even just have ONE miracle like Mary, that’s why we’re here. That’s what Jesus did” she ended.

The age of women being helped in the last years has increased into their 20’s and 30’s. So, their reach continues to expand. They just seek to be there for women, with love, without judgement. 

It’s a beautiful picture of being Christ in the world. The lives changed, the one life changed, that’s what it’s all about.   

Cheryl said they host a large gala in the spring to raise funds. There’s a huge silent auction, a live auction with Jay Litchfield, who donates his time to so many charities. Cheryl said, “There’s usually one shout out by Jay, at the end of the evening. One year he asked what we owed on the home for the women. We raised the funds that night to pay it off. It’s just exciting to see what God brings to help us meet the needs of these women.” Cheryl went on, “The last shout out, we started a scholarship fund and we’re sending our girls to dental hygiene school, to TCC, and they are becoming women capable of supporting themselves and their children.” Cheryl couldn’t stop sharing all of the ways they are touching women, even though she was interviewing from out of town. Her 27th grandchild had just been born and she was helping with all the kiddos in the house as her daughter recovered. Her energy at 72 is enviable to say the least!

I asked Cheryl about her plans, as she had a birthday since the first time we talked. Cheryl said, “I can’t imagine stopping. I will say to Stephanie Johnson, who runs adoption, ‘Am I still relevant?’ She tells me the girls still love my involvement. I can’t fathom sitting at home and doing nothing. That’s why I keep pushing.” In the fall when we spoke, she thought she could continue to volunteer until 75. So, I asked her if that was still the plan. She fired back with passion, “I’m pretty healthy. I’ve been thinking about it. I think I can make it until 80 now. Why would I not keep doing it?” I wholeheartedly agreed with her. Why wouldn’t she?  

The conversation turned immediately to seniors and the amazing impact they can have. Cheryl said, “Volunteering with these girls will absolutely revitalize their lives with energy and strength they didn’t even know they had. I see so many people just sit down in retirement and that was not God’s plan for us. I encourage people to come and get involved. Come to a support group meeting. Sit there and hear the girls’ stories. See if you don’t catch the fire.” Cheryl has seen women come to the meeting, then think to themselves, “I just love her. I could have her in my home for dinner.” 

Cheryl finished, “There’s just a connection that happens. Do what you are passionate about with what God has given you.

Because being a senior doesn’t mean you stop being a part of things that are important to God.”

If you would like to explore how you MIGHT get involved, reach out to Jennifer Brown at 918.346.4426 today or check out www.crisispregnancyoutreach.org. Don’t wait until tomorrow.  Tomorrow becomes next week. Then next week becomes next year.  Do it today!

Save the Date

March 30, 2019

Crisis Pregnancy Outreach Gala


They are vibrant and youthful.  This morning I met a 70 year old woman with her face still healing from a significant amount of stitches. She was buying a car with her boyfriend. She apologized to me for being out with her face still healing. I laughed with her, as I told her it was fine as I fully believed I felt a little like she looked right now. She explained she had been using a man’s bicycle. She was unfamiliar with how to operate it in general. She headed down a path without knowing how to put on the brakes. We laughed (as she winced in pain from her side bruises). She said “I just wasn’t sure how I was going to stop. So I just dove off the path and into a pile of gravel.” We both knew what happened wasn’t really funny, but the story itself in the way she presented—yeah, giggles. We talked for quite a while discussing everything from ClearTone hearing aids to the fact that she just moved to Springfield, MO. As a Life.Church’er, I encouraged her to go check out the new campus there. Turns out, she had already checked out the building before she headed to Tulsa! 

I loved her sense of adventure and passion for life. It reminded me that 70 is the new 50. Many seniors wonder what they will do after retirement. I searched.  I can’t find any retirement passages in the Bible. I think that’s because true retirement, as a concept, was created to push older folks out of jobs to make way for newer, younger workers in a world where jobs were needed.  Somehow, it’s now become the end all be all for a life goal.  Everyone either can’t wait to retire or spends a little time griping they won’t be able to do so.  Of course, now we have groups trying to retire at 40 with stricter budgets. I guess the idea caught on.

Seniors live longer and are in better shape than ever before. There is life after 65–and it’s really all in what you choose to make it. Whether it’s chasing the grandkids or hopping on the unfamiliar bicycle of life, it’s there for the taking. It’s really up to you. (Although we do recommend checking out the brakes first!). Life is meant to be lived. Jesus said “…I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.” John 10:10.  

Here’s just a few places looking for volunteers of all ages and make an IMPACT for Christ:

Mend Crisis Pregnancy Center: This ministry impacts the lives of mothers and children right here in Tulsa.  They help women, who find themselves pregnant, and don’t know what to do.  They have a non-judgmental environment to help them get to a better place to be able to love and care for women, children, and even fathers. They also help facilitate adoptions. 

www.mendpregnancy.org

Joy in the Cause: Serving individuals and families facing life-altering situations, one package of care at a time.

www.joyinthecause.org

Good Samaritan Health Services: Tulsa based healthcare going into communities to serve those without insurance needing medical care.  They are literally changing lives through his love.  

www.goodsamaritanhealth.org

Senior Moments, Sponsored by Visiting Angels, offering home care with excellent care, exceptional caregivers, efficient communication and an economical cost.  

www.visitingangels.com

918.609.5600 

The list could go on. The opportunities aren’t hard to find, but they are looking for a few good men and women with a heart to reach the city for Christ.  For 2019, maybe you set your sights even higher than they have been set before. Can’t wait to see you write in to tell us where God leads you in your new endeavors of life!